Arizona
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
Florida
Georgia
Illinois
Indiana
Kansas
Kentucky
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Missouri
Nevada
New Jersey
New York
North Carolina
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Virginia
Washington
Washington DC
Wisconsin
Jamaica

Kenya
Tanzania
Djibouti
Uganda
South Africa
Zambia
in ETHIOPIA
Addis Ababa
Awassa
Dire Dawa
Bahir Dar


< Home > Restaurants > Washington
Dining Suggestions
Ethiopian Spices
Injera & Teff
Ethiopian Coffee
Recipes
For Vegetarians
Celebrity Chefs
Restaurant Names
Holidays & Fasting
Ethiopian Calendar
Jamaica & Rastafaris
Ethiopian Jews
Common Phrases
Gursha Hand-feeding
Tej - Honey Wine
Ethiopian Beer (Bira)
Ethiopia and Famine
In the News
Photo Album
Restaurants in Ethiopia

WASHINGTON

Ethiopian Restaurants in Washington State
15 Ethiopian Restaurants in Seattle, WA
 

Addis Café
1224 E Jefferson St
Seattle, WA 98122

Assimba
2722 E Cherry St
Seattle, WA 98122

Blue Nile
456 12th Ave
Seattle, WA 98122

Cafe Selam
2715 E Cherry St
Seattle, WA 98122

Cafe Soleil
1400 34th Ave
Seattle, WA 98122

Enat Ethiopia
11546 15th Ave NE
Seattle, WA 98125

 

 

 

Fasica
3808 S Edmunds St
Seattle, WA 98118

Ghion
7821 Rainer Ave. S.
Seattle, WA 98118

Gojo
334 Northgate Way Suite 123
Seattle, WA 98125

Lalibela
2800 E Cherry St Ste A
Seattle, WA 98122

Meskel
1223 E Cherry St
Seattle, WA 98122

Mesob
1325 E Jefferson St
Seattle, WA 98122

 

Ras Dashen
2801 E Cherry St.
Seattle, WA 98122

Saba
112 12th Ave
Seattle, WA 98122

Tana
2518 E. Cherry St.
Seattle, WA 98122

Queen Sheba
916 E John St
Seattle, WA 98102

Pan African Cafe
1521 1ST Ave
Seattle, WA 98101

Zobel
1219 E Jefferson St
Seattle, WA 98122

Where Cabbies Eat - Seattle Weekly

Seattle Weekly
If there's a line of taxis out front, you can bet the food is good.
By Liza B. Zimmerman

"... As a relative newcomer to Seattle, I always wondered what culinary surprises lurked behind restaurant doors here with rows of taxis outside. So I took a little time to find out, chatting with drivers on the day and night shifts, and hopping a ride to some of their favorite joints.

There are approximately 1,200 cab drivers in King County, according to Terry Davis, acting director of the county's Cab Drivers' Alliance. Almost all of them are male, with the exception of about five women, and they hail from 10 to 12 different countries, he estimates. "Most of the cab drivers are not really overweight," notes Davis. The reason becomes clear when you hear about the great ethnic eats they are digging into.

"I eat mostly at the Addis Cafe," says Worku Melese, as he sits in the cab line outside Seattle's posh Fairmont Olympic Hotel. Kitfo (steak tartare, prepared with butter) and tibs (a dish of spicy beef or lamb cooked with onions and peppers) are his favorites. The Addis, in the Central District, has a bar in front and traditional Ethiopian dyed reed tables upstairs for dining. The meat and vegetable combo plate ($13.99) is enough for two, and the light Harar beer ($4) pairs well with the spicy food. After dinner, you can even shoot a game of pool at the table in back.

The nearby Cafe Selam is a favorite of Fasika Moges, a driver who is also an accomplished painter (he shows his work at Columbia City Gallery). Moges goes to Selam for foul, a favorite cabbie breakfast dish. Spicy fava beans covered with scallions, tomatoes, onions, and hard-boiled eggs ($6), this luscious dish is often available all day. Selam's beef kitfo ($8) is spicy, and its beef tibs ($8) are succulent. They can be sampled with a glass of traditional tej (honey wine) for $3.50 or a Bedele Light beer for $3.25. Owner Abebu Wondem says she gets about 20 cab drivers a day, who come mostly for the tibs and her famous foul.

Down the STREET is the Tana Market, a combination store and restaurant where Wessen Darge, an Ethiopian native who has lived in Seattle for 15 years, says they make the best beef tibs ($8) in town. They also stock bags of the sour flatbread injera, and loads of traditional spices like bessobila (Ethiopian basil); they even sell corn dogs and burritos. Darge also likes Meskel Ethiopian Restaurant down the street for its kitfo, which he calls "hot and yummy." Between meals, he goes to Starbucks for snacks. "I spend $1,200 a year there, and they have never given me a cup of free coffee." When not at Starbucks or the Tana, he notes he is also available "to go the Met or Anthony's if someone invites me."

Darge also makes his own bread to share with other drivers. He says it's a healthy alternative to the butter- and egg-based breads he finds all over town. The flavor, he notes, is somewhere between cake and bread: It's "a bread that our moms make." You will have to catch up with him in the taxi rank outside the Westin if you want to try it .... >>more


 



©2004-2012 Ethiopian Restaurant .com