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HORN OF AFRICA

Horn Of Africa Restaurant
1041 Murfreesboro Pike
Nashville, TN 37217
Phone (615) 366-3468
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  • Mon - Sun
    12pm-10pm
    Closest Intersection Crescent Center Shopping Center
    Payment Methods Mastercard, Visa, AmEx, Cash, Debit
    Liquor Info  
    Dress Code Casual
       


    INFO & EVENTS

    Owner Gizachew Tesfaye

     

    PRESS & REVIEWS

    Nashville Scene

    Owner Gizachew Tesfaye originally opened Nashville's first Ethiopian restaurant, Addis Ababa, several years ago, then sold it a couple years later. Lucky for us, he got back into the business and opened this restaurant, bringing the same attention to quality that marked his former establishment at its finest. There are a couple of unusual dishes worth noting: doro ferfer , which consists of chicken wat mixed in with chunks of injera bread, and bozena shiro , a robust, spicy stew of yellow split peas and chopped beef in berbere sauce. >>more


    Nashville Scene

    Few cuisines are more exotic, or more fun to eat, than Ethiopian food. Your meal comes out on a giant platter piled in colorful mounds on a spongy, tangy round of flatbread called injera . Another platter arrives with folded pieces of injera, which serve as edible scoops for spicy stews made with lentils, beef or chicken, along with milder, but no less flavorful samplings of vegetables. Ask for them, and the server will bring a fiery-red hot sauce and a small side of homemade soft cheese. Thanks to the plentiful bread, it's always a remarkably filling meal, and thanks to the communal nature of the meal, it's hard to spend more than $10 a person (though eating solo is hardly any pricier). There's only a handful of Ethiopian restaurants serving Nashville's small but visible East African population, and this is our favorite, though we've just gotten word that it's under new ownership. The good news is that the menu has expanded to include more than a dozen items-including a salad(!) It's a modest little storefront, tucked away in a strip center that doesn't even face the street, but should still be well worth searching out. >>more




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