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Ethiopian Jews - Felashas/Beta Israel
Baruch Dego - Ethiopian Israeli Soccer Sensation
Addisu Messela - Ethiopian-born Labor Knesset member
Ethiopian Jews 'Falasha or Beta Israel', although a very small segment of the Ethiopian population their airlifting/immigration to Israel starting in 1984 got world press attention and in the West. Today there are around 80,000 Ethiopian Jews living in Israel,

Falasha's mostly come from Gondar state in the north west of Ethiopia, "According to one tradition, the Ethiopian Jews are the descendants of one of the ten tribes, as their religion is an ancient form of biblical Judaism. Their religious practices are prescribed by the Orit, the Torah translated into their Gez dialect." (PBS - Where are the Ten Lost Tribes? ).

Ethiopian Jews share the same cuisine found at most Ethiopian Restaurant.

There are a few good sites that detail their airlifting to Isreal and their life in Israel now.

Israel to take all Ethiopian Jews - by BBC
The Israeli Government are to speed up the moving of the remaining 18,000 Ethiopian Jews to the Middle East.

The Israel Association for Ethiopian Jews (IAEJ) was formed in 1993 in response to the growing crisis facing Israel's Ethiopian immigrant community with regards to education, housing and employment.

Beta Israel-Ethiopia PBS - Where are the Ten Lost Tribes?
In the latter part of the twelfth century, a legend appeared which persisted for several centuries and reached Egypt, Palestine and Europe. According to this legend, a Christian priest named Prester John ruled as monarch over a vast and wealthy Christian Empire. According to many traditions, Ethiopia was the land of the powerful Prester John's kingdom, as well as the home of the ten lost tribes. Persistent rumor had it that these African Israelite kingdoms were at constant war with Prester John, and that their armies were advancing on Rome.

Who are these African-Jewish tribesmen so central to the Prester John legend? These are the Ethiopian Jews known both as Falashas, the Amharic word for landless, wandering Jews, and as Beta Israel, the house of Israel. In Ethiopia, they engaged primarily in agriculture, but were known also for their exquisite crafts and jewelry. Today, most of the Beta Israel live in the state of Israel. In the 1970's and 80's, the Israeli government airlifted thousands of Ethiopian Jews to Israel, rescuing them from political and economic distress.

According to one tradition, the Ethiopian Jews are the descendants of one of the ten tribes, as their religion is an ancient form of biblical Judaism. Their religious practices are prescribed by the Orit, the Torah translated into their Gez dialect. They possess none of the post-biblical laws. Over the centuries, the Beta Israel have been connected with the tribe of Dan. This association has eased the process of their return to the state of Israel in recent times.

Ethiopian Jews

-
Felashas - Beta Israel
- 85,000 living in Israel
- Most immigrated in the last 20 years
- Felasha: one in transition/in exile
- Mostly from the Gondar region in Ethiopia, some in Tigrai
- The dishes at any typical Ethiopian Restaurant will reflect their dishes

 

Shegar Ethiopian Restaurant
10 Agrippas Street
Jerusalem
Israel

Ansra Ethiopian Restaurant
17 Jaffa Street
Jerusalem
Israel

Ethiopian Spice Shop
Mahane Yehuda Market
Agripas Street and Jaffa Street
Jerusalem
Israel



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